Our Commitment to anti-racism

The LDBS is committed to being actively anti-racist.

The schools we support are rich in their diversity and we believe that this diversity brings strength and opportunity. Racism and other forms of discrimination are wholly incompatible with Jesus’ promise of “life in all its fullness” and our vision of human flourishing.

As an organisation we have a zero-tolerance towards discrimination of any kind and we are committed to challenging and removing structural racism and discrimination within the Diocese. We expect staff working for the LDBS and for Church schools increasingly to reflect the diversity of their communities. We celebrate the current diversity of our staff and are taking active steps to address current under-representation.

We know we have more to do, and we continue to identify and address systemic issues through a strong programme of action. We seek deep change that will be sustained and embedded.

If you have experienced racism or discrimination of any kind through the LDBS or a Church of England school in London we encourage you to speak with our Head of HR terri.patterson@london.anglican.org. We welcome opportunities to listen to and learn from all those we serve.

If you are interested in working in a Church of England school in The Diocese of London, you can find our vacancies here. We are especially keen to hear from those with a global majority heritage. If you would like to find out more about what it is like to work in a Church school we will arrange for you to meet one of our headteachers.

If you are interested in being a school governor there is more information and an application form here. We are especially keen to hear from those with a global majority heritage. If you would like to find out more about the difference that school governors can make to the culture and direction of a school, we will arrange for you to meet one of our chairs of governors.

 

March 2022 Update

We, alongside many in our school communities, have been deeply affected by what happened to Child Q in Hackney. Noone who has read the Child Q Local Safeguarding Practice report can fail to be distressed that this incident took place in a school, or by the reminder that the experience of Black children in London can be very different to that of their white peers.

The LDBS will continue to identify and address systemic issues through a strong programme of action. We seek deep change that will be sustained and embedded.